Heroes of Camelot

Heroes of Camelot
Players:
1
Multiplayer:Online, once you reach level 10.
AI:Increases in difficulty as you level up.
Universal App:Yes (there is a single app which works on both iPhone and iPad in HD)
Purchase for iPhone:Use link below to purchase universal app
Purchase for iPad:
Heroes of Camelot
Price: Free
User rating:
GD Star Rating
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Heroes of Camelot, 3.4 out of 10 based on 11 ratings

Heroes of Camelot is an “RPG Multiplayer Battle Card Game”, a Collectible Card Game which incorporates a number of features from various similar titles. There are a plethora of free-to-play CCGs on the App Store, and at first blush it would appear that Heroes of Camelot is yet another variation of this genre. However, where Heroes of Camelot stands out from the other titles is its impressive artwork. The cards are beautifully illustrated and well designed, making reading the stats on them quick and easy.

Anatomy of a card

Anatomy of a card

GAMEPLAY

At the start of the Heroes of Camelot, you have to choose a side: Druid or Camelot.

Choose your side

Choose your side

Next, you are given one 3 star card as your leader card. Each of the cards you gain in the game range from one to five stars, with five star cards considered “ultra rare” and 1 star cards being common. The overall point of the game is to collect cards (the higher star the better), enhance them to their maximum level, evolve them and then use these powerful cards to win battles. Enhancing a card allows you to choose low level cards to discard and transfer their value to a higher level card of your choice. Once a card reaches its maximum level through enhancing, you can then evolve it by combining it with another identical card to gain a new level. Although you can evolve a card at any time (as long as you have two of the same card), it is better to enhance a card to its maximum level before progressing on to evolving the card. This ensures your card will achieve the highest stats possible when evolved.

Prepare for battle!

Prepare for battle!

In order to gain cards, you level up through exploring the world of Camelot and its surrounding areas – the south western corner of England. As your questing progresses through the map, new areas become unlocked, each with a different backdrop. However, the same repetitive technique applies: explore, fight bosses and collect potions and gold. Fighting bosses requires various amounts of mana per card and exploring/questing requires stamina. Although both gradually refill over time, you can refill faster by collecting potions while exploring or buying them in the in-game gem shop. Bear in mind that gems cost real money through in-app purchases. Whilst IAP does help you progress in the single player campaign, it isn’t essential if you put some effort into crafting a decent deck. This is a big win for me, as I’m really not a fan of overpriced IAP in a pay-to-win model. That being said, the prices for gems in the shop are a bit scarey!

The Gem Shop

The Gem Shop

Battles occur often during the game and whilst the artwork is pleasing, I found the gameplay during these battles to be less immersive than the rest of the game. The battle rages between the two factions, with the player simply watching as the actions are completed automatically. However, the fact that you have so much control over your cards, their abilities and the team configurations more than makes up for this.

Stunning artwork during the automated battle scenes

Stunning artwork during the automated battle scenes

Once you reach level 10 in the game (which won’t take long), you can have up to three teams of cards, allowing you to make some powerful combinations which in turn gives you special bonuses. This is by far the strongest mechanic in the game and the part I enjoyed the most.

You can have up to 3 teams.

You can have up to 3 teams.

Reaching level 10 also opens up the Arena, the multiplayer section of the game where you battle against other players. Each Arena battle requires an Arena ticket, and these can be found in random drops whilst exploring the single player quests, or bought with gems. However, success in the Arena depends on fighting many battles and as you’ll never have enough tickets, you’ll have to grind in the quests or spend money on gems. This is the one area of the game which does feel very much like pay-to-win, but I do think it’s fair. After all, Heroes of Camelot is free, there are no iAds in-game and the single player section of the game won’t cost you anything if you play strategically.

Online multiplayer in the arena

Online multiplayer in the arena

IMPLEMENTATION

I cannot stress enough just how exquisite the artwork in this game is. Incredible attention to detail has been applied to every part of the game, resulting in a highly-polished product. Gameplay is intuitive and easy to learn via the interactive tutorial at the start of the game. Whilst access to the multiplayer section requires grinding or IAP, it is nonetheless a lot of fun and very addictive.

Just look at this gorgeous artwork!

Just look at this gorgeous artwork!

The in-game chat client is a great idea, but it’s flaky and prone to trolls. This feature needs an overhaul or at least the option to disable it.

Questing/exploring is very repetitive. The chat client is flaky.

Questing/exploring is very repetitive. The chat client is flaky.

Playing the single player quests on an iPad that has no Internet connection (e.g. on the train) results in drawn cards not displaying their artwork. Instead, they are blank white, indicating that all artwork assets are stored on Kabam’s servers rather than in the app. This detracts pleasure from the gameplay somewhat when playing offline.

The game interface is easy to use and visually appealing, but it is slightly marred by the fact that you have to press the back button several times to get to different screens. Perhaps if the icons at the sides of the screen were a bit smaller, more could be fitted in to allow quick access to every screen.

VERDICT

7/10 Stunning artwork and well-crafted game mechanics makes this a solid title. However, it is a little let down by the necessity to grind or pay to win at multiplayer. The questing/exploring part of the game is very repetitive and lacks the gloss that the rest of the game exudes.



  • talarson8

    Which iap should I use?